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>>> was interviewed about his book that the u.s. naval academy in annapolis maryland. this interviews part of book tv college series and it's a little under 15 minutes. >> book tv is on location that the u.s. naval academy in annapolis maryland where we are interviewing some professors who are also authors. .. >> "in buddha's company" thai soldiers in the vietnam war" what warded did thailand play? >> they were a very close ally during the vietnam war. people familiar would know that not only did thailand send troops to fight along the united states, but also served as a base for many aircraft for bombing missions over ho chi minh trail, over laos and at the time we had built seven their bases and developed a port as well to facilitate the u.s. effort and also many soldiers went to bangkok and in terms of support thailand was the close ally. >>host: did they have soldiers? >> absolutely. they spent 37 -- cent to 37,000 soldiers to fight in vietnam also they sent smaller naval units but defin
with the goal of helping representative residentr lives. philip came to the u.s. from hong kong when he was a teenager. he attended george washington high school and worked as a youth counselor for the mayor's office summer youth program. he was a vista volunteer with the california youth authority before joining the san francisco housing authority?hp$k in '78. he holds a banc bachelor's degre from san francisco state university. he's a member of board of directors for self-help of the elderly. pamela, earned a injuries doctor and a public law certificate from the university of san francisco school of law and became a member of the state bar of california in 2010. she chaired the student bar association diversity committee, nationally recognized with the american bar association henry j. ramsey jr. award towards advancement of diverse individuals. pamela also earned a bachelor of arts at the university of california at davis. leland reuben was born and raised in san francisco, where he first developed a strong passion for working with l÷pápñ community. he currently oversees the inten
. it's important to shut this off. we use it for cooking, eating and hot water. there were 40,000 people that called pg and e about their gas. that means they call turned off their gas? did they need to do that? when do you have to? when there is a problem. how long did you think it takes pg and e to get out and turn it back on? 45,000 people. days weeks, may be a month. who has seen this in the streets. a lot of muck is in there is it's full of dirt and weeds you turn it to the right to tighten it and left to loosen it. your home work you have to look at your house, pop open the lid, look in there see what's going on in there it's not nice and clean like this. who has seen this around their house? everybody. each meter has a shut off. you want to find out where your gas meter is. you can keep track of your usage but you will know how to shut it off. here's the shut off. i have some tools up here, you can look at these. any hardware store has these. they fit on this and it allows you to turn off the gas. when we talk about the wheels it's these on top. if you have a broken pip
was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water sy
us to the table in the first place. so, this is kind of a balance between representative democracy where you have 26 appointed members and participatory democracy where you have the community as a whole. i know other planning processes have had town hall meetings or public workshops where people come and they sit and they watch the powerpoint presentation. but we wanted to take that much further. it's much more important to give people the tools of planning, to expose them to what you can do and what you can't do, and not get them lost in ephemeral notions of changing your community in the snap of a finger. planning can do many things. so, we also reached out to the community. we brought task force meetings down into the neighborhood as often as we could. we sat in a night club on 11th street when we launched the whole idea of the social heritage district. we had a four-hour seminar type saturday that was held in the community room at the folsom door apartments where people -- we published a schedule and people that wanted to address various issues like affordable housing, transpor
she and the professional educators year aircraft for the u.s. navy in 10 years ago made the transition to academia where the provided the outstanding opportunity for graduate school to have a specialty in a geographic part of the world where i specialize in middle eastern history. >>host: allen author "the politics and security of the >>guest: it is. the part of the world with united states has been involved in the iran-iraq war, desert shield, desert storm and operation in iraqi freedom. it is a big topic and it needs to be discussed and investigated. >>host: where do you begin talking about u.s. involvement? >>guest: the u.s. involvement in the valleys goes much further back. we specifically look at the persian and gulf even though they sent some ships it is really world for to the united states and military get involved in a big way. surprisingly it does not have to do with the oil. world war ii marked the entry of the united states and its military to provide a secure pathway for supplies to the beleaguered soviet russian allies in their quest to defeat the germans.
importantly we knew if we didn't just talk the talk, that if we actually took the residents with us, and took all of the talent that we had in the city from the housing authority to our mayor's office of housing, to the redevelopment people, to the private developers, to the staff that has been so diligent, to the private nonprofit sector. the in incredible community based organizations and the bay view y and all these wonderful people that have been struggling for years saying "can we get some help? can we get some love in the town? can we do something that will get us all together? and we can all these nonprofits and bridge and mercy and coming together saying we can all do it and we team up with hope sf and the partners they created in saying it's not just brick and mortar that we're doing here. it's people first. the first thing that we have to do is bring hope to the people living there and then we went about saying what is the best way to do it? what are the best examples of rebuilding -- not housing. we said rebuild community. that's what we invested in and that's where the labo
and delightful insights into what he was really like. thank you so much. that was fantastic what you did for us. christopher stevens was obviously an extraordinary human being and contributor. every year at stanford we have a group of what we call national security fellows come. they were roughly army, navy, air force, state department. a couple weeks ago we had a meeting and the first person i called on was an army colonel. i said where were you last? he said in libya. i said did you know christopher stevens? he said everybody knew christopher stevens. he was our leader, fluent in arabic, constructive, positive, doing something, he was our leader. this spontaneous practically eruption from him. he was a foreign service officer. anybody who has served with a foreign service as i did as the secretary of state knows, what a very special group of people this is. they are very able people. dedicated. they work hard for our country. chris was extraordinary and stood out. i thought what image can i think of that might express our way of thinking about him. i thought of the great seal of our republic.
that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looking at why this building came to be, in many ways it also included mayor gavin newsome, particularly, who really had an affection for this building. he saw the design. he saw the potential. he wanted to make sure that that building got built. and he said, do what you need to do, but please, if you can make that building work, we need to have that building in civic center. >> i happened to be at a green conference santa clara. he said you shouldn't cancel that project. can you work with us? michael cohen phoned
in a wheelchair without use of my hand or legs. >> announcer: then, another challenge. >> as if being quadriplegic wasn't enough, she has breast cancer. >> announcer: she stays strong with a positive outlook on life. >> divine alignment happens in every one of our lives. >> reporter: coincidences, chance encounters or part of a bigger plan. >> god is moving us along toward our destiny. >> reporter: plus, syndicated talk show host larry elder how a man-to-man talk end aid family feud between father and son. >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, governor mike huckabee. [applause]. >> gov. mike huckabee: thank you, thank you very much. thank you very much, audience. and, welcome to huckabee from the fox news studios in new york city. i hope that you and your family are enjoying some precious and special time together, during this thanksgiving holiday. you know, we all have a lot to be grateful for but sometimes we have to stop and realize it. i'm grateful that i have work, knowing that many of my fellow americans don't. i'm grateful to have the freedom to speak my mind. even criticize the government, e
very much. having said that, more of the nuts and bolts-- (off mic) >> hi. >> would you like to use mine? >> no. it's okay. i appreciate everything that i learned, and i still have a lot to learn from you. maybe i will be writing you long letters on how to proceed on my career here. as i expand my other avenues also. it would be terrific to keep in touch with you so that i can also - because i feel a kinship to you. because you've been so helpful and so friendly and open and we have become friends. i really appreciate you and love you. and maybe you will become councilmember in hawaii and invite us over to your part of the country so we can observe what they're doing in hawaii in the disability community. we will stay in touch. i also wanted to do something. (correction) give you something. i want to thank you so much for all the work that you have done for our community. and continued work. i want to see you continue to work. you are so good. you have the compassion. you have the goal of being a real people person. people would love you anyway whether or not you are work
concerns. if i can use the overhead projector. so when -- so the distance of 50' is not actually 50'. so when you think about, it's from the property line. it's not from the center of a restaurant. and so it's actually closer to 60' of a buffer zone. from our perspective, what that does and the map i'm going to show you here -- so the black is actually the available air area for use. all of the dots are existing restaurants and this by the way, as you can see is a 50' diameter. when you move, when you move to a 60' diameter, you can see it becomes much more concentrated and space becomes much more limited. so i think in terms of what the industry vendors are actually interested in is something much closer to a 33' distance. which looks more like that. this is 40'. so it's actually a little bit -- it shows a little bit more space than is available, but really it still leaves opportunity for areas. as you can see, certain areas that are highly dense with restaurants would be out of bounds. the other thing i wanted to bring up is the idea of parking. this permit has given people
during the holiday season and consumers make up 70% of the u.s. economy. during the holiday-shortened week the markets moved in tandem for the fiscal cliff. up more midweek. the markets continued to climb on friday. stunning accusations that one of america's iconic companies hewlett-packard which acquired autonomy last year for $11 billion is accusing autonomy of what it called serious improprieties in its bookkeeping and inflating its own value. meg witman says the company lied about how much it was worth. >> we believe there's a willful effort on the part of certain members of autonomy management to mislead shareholders when they were a publicly held companies and mislead buyers including hp and we stand by the forensic review we have seen. as you know, we have turned it over to the fcc. >> we are shocked. we have been pretty ambushed by this today. first we heard about it was a press release and we refute them. they are factually incorrect. we'd like to learn more about them. i'm afraid the details haven't been shared with us. >> reporter: autonomy ceo said the company fo
asian-americans on federal benches. those of us to understand the impact of the supreme court and what it can do or on june, we know that having asian-americans on the federal bench is a line up for appointments to the supreme court. thank you very much for this opportunity. i want to say that silicon valley is the birthplace of high-tech. silicon valley is the birthplace of norm. five minutes? thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you, congressmen. we would have extended the five minutes if we got a karaoke's song. >> this event would have not been possible by the financial contributions of our sponsors. we want to thank chevron corp., wells fargo, mcdonald's, academy of arts university, at&t, southwest airlines. if you have not entered their raffled yet, do so later tonight. comcast, walmart, verizon, moon star restaurant. >> we go from the greatest karaoke's singer in the house of congress to the self-proclaimed worst karaoke singing in public office. i would like to introduce california state controller, serving his second term. he takes a hard-line and took immediate action to
.7 million in regional transit performance initiative funding. this funding is to be used for improving reliability. there is no more effectiveádz-zy to chief these goals, this funding should be dedicated 100% to improving muni's deteriorating reliability by purchasing muni vehicles and improving muni's operations. the resolution i sponsored and that is before us today to provides. the mta board of directors is considering a proposal to use a portion of this region a funding not for improving muni's reliability for the youth. i've been public in my skepticism of the free muni for youth program. my skepticism is based on the funding needs and deficit and my belief that the funding will come from muni operating money. worry now seeing that's the case, that muni is considering using some of this maintenance money for the free muni program rather than to invest in the system, purchase vehicles, rehabilitate vehicles, and over-wise make the system more reliable. once a free muni pilot program ends there will be enormous pressure to extend the program and that pressure almost certainly will
anything happens with out fear of having us say, no, we are going to shut it down. we want to work with you to make it happen, but it means as safely as possible. certainly, alcohol always played a role as well as the age of the patrons, and on and on. again, please give us a chance to further develop the trust that we have been building over the last several years. some of the questions that they ask, or issues that they speak to, like the alcohol licensing unit, that is because i heard you with regard to working with licenses, having security plans so there can be one pinpoint that everything can pass through. commanders are the successors and hopefully it will be around a while and always be resourced. it is really important that you take our input and that we come out for a safer event and that people are going to want to come to san francisco and that they will not have any trepidation again, i think the fact that everything is booming right now in san francisco would go a long way to say that we kind of got this thing figured out, but we can always get better. before i leave and pass
. >> and miss ly. >> here. >> i would like to stand up and joint us for the pledge of allegiance. okay. we are going to we have a fairly nice agenda for today and hopefully we will zip there it. >> item a, approval of board minutes of may, 8, 22, october 9ed. >> any objections? >> seeing none? >> mr. yee. >> yes. miss fewer. >> yes. >> maufus, yes. >> miss norton. >> miss wynn? aye. >> and mr. yee. aye. >> item b. >> presentation of the board of education superintendant report. >> superintendant carranza? >> thank you, members of the board and the public and good evening this evening and i am very excited to say thank you for joining us and as you can tell, we are very, very excited because before i shared my thoughts for the evening, i want to say go giants. >> yes. [ applause ] >> so, we want to congratulate our home town giants on a great, great playoff season. and victory in the world series. so, what i would like to do is share a few comments with you this evening. we were very, very honored, a couple of nights ago to be part of the university of california san francisco community par
. it reminds us of what the history was. >> there is a section for dogs and plenty of parking. transit is available on the 28 bus to get you very easily. the part is ada -- park is ada accessible. it is also a natural lake. this is your chance to stroll around the lake and let the kids run free. it also has many birds to watch. it is a place to find and appreciate what you -- a wonderful breath of fresh air. come and experience in this park and enjoy the people, picnics, and sunshine. this is a lovely place to take a stroll with your loved ones. in the middle of pacific heights, on top of these hills, it offers a great square, a peaceful beauty, large trees and grass and greenery. it features tables and benches, a playground, restaurants, and tennis courts. there are plenty of areas for football and picnics. it is very much a couple's park. there are many activities you can experience together. stroll on the pathways, bring your dog, or just picnic at one of the many tables and enjoy all that it has to offer together. many couples find this is a perfect park to throw down a blanket an
] >> sort of spices up the meeting. >> for us, i think the most important thing we are offering is something quintessentially san francisco. something that they cannot find anywhere else. we have two fetish fares in san francisco. there are only three other cities in the world that do that. new york, toronto, and berlin. i have been to all three and they are not nearly the same size as well we produced, or nearly as diverse. what we are always thinking about is what we are offering people that is so quintessentially san francisco that we get -- it cannot be gotten anywhere else. we are also told the switching of the entertainment this year. we have dance areas where the slides used to be. i think that for us it is about making sure that people, even if they came to san francisco in particular five years ago, that they are not experiencing the fight -- the same thing. it speaks to one of the priorities. the never-ending city. or something. i do not remember, exactly, but it is the same basic concept. even if you come here several times over and over, you will not have the same experience. as
can see he was offering his own form of enlightenment. he was guiding us away from the dark time known as the disco era. [ laughter] who knew that chris would work his timeless style for the next 34 years. look at the effect on me, who is wearing the button-down now that. was the first life lesson from chris. stick with the classics, they won't go out of style. that said, my wife has gently advised me the definition of a classic look does not extend to certain flannel shirts from 1982. our next topic on the less sons that we learned from chris back then involve culture. this is beyond the stereotypical fraternity life experience, because i was lucky enough to live with chris and another famous piedmonter austin tichner. talk about enlightening. he dubbed our large room the triple occupancy club. little did i know this came with the added bonus of an extracurricular education in the arts. chris arrived with his stack of lps, many courtesy of his step dad, bob. the chronicle music critic at the time. austin contributed his eclectic theater and comedy recordings and, well, himself. those
school district. this is a supplemental that is asking us to give 2.7 million out of our state reserve fund to assist the school district. both in the recent cuts that have been made for the 21st century for their after school funding and also to assist in helping our first two classes of graduates that have to graduate a through g to graduate. as many of you have read in the press we are finding a large number of students are not on track to graduate and our first class to graduate a through g is set in the next few semesters. we have a short timeframe to do that in. we have made this commitment to grow and encourage jobs in the city. we new he had to make sure that our students that are growing up in the city are able to access those jobs because they're graduating college-ready. i want to be clear when we talk about a through g i hear the debate not all kids have to go to college and i agree but all of our kids have to graduate ready for college because you graduate ready for college you're able to access living wage jobs and if you don't have math and science classes that are requi
think is going to be one of those really special and useful pieces of this concept. thank you. >> thank you. >> is there any other public comment on this item? being none, public comment is closed. >> commissioner lowe. >> thank you, president beal. this did come before the capitol committee. we did move this matter to the full commission for the following reason the matter was heard by the capital committee we didn't have a full package. we do now have a full package, included in your package, which is the mitigation monitoring and reporting program. certificate of determination and exemption from environmental review. and a community benefit plan. so we do now have a complete package. we did move this to the general calendar with the recommendation of approval. i would like make the motion to have this project approved. >> commissioner, is it the resolution that you would like to adopt that is in your binder? >> yes. >> thank you. >> commissioner. >> prior to seconding my colleague's motion, i want to say a week ago i was contacted by the head of the union square association
. and in instances where they could, they brought in satellite trucks to actually use satellite to backhaul the information, avoiding -- where it was necessary, avoiding the land line networks and using satellite. using generators, using batteries to really try and keep the network up and running. >> host: now, what about b emergency communications? how were they affected? >> guest: the psaps, the public safety answering points, the folks who field 911 calls, very few of them went down. they're sort of consolidated so they don't have a lot of areas that they have to really protect. so we saw that 911 worked well, and i think the mayor's office in new york city talked about, boy, use text where you can. i think that's a good message to deliver to consumers. use texting wherever you can, leave the phone calls to 911, to the really important calls. and otherwise use texting or use your data connections to gather information. >> host: did the spectrum get flooded with information and overloading? >> guest: sure. their, i mean, usage was pretty tremendous, and we found this out wherever you have
possibilities there are for resources for that project, if any. so it is an item that needs to come before us. whether we can do something with it or not, i think we still need to have some transparency about that. >> yeah. i agree, commissioner, that i think it is a discussion we should have. i personally would like to get a tour of the facilities that are out there and any other commissioner that wants to familiarize himself with it. because it seems that we have a permanent place on this agenda that it's talked about. whether we like it or not. so maybe we can like it a little more. >> i actually don't know where they are. i would like to -- >> yeah, we -- >> okay. >> and in fact, we did -- when i first came on as commissioner we did do a tour of the facilities. it was laid out what was going to go where, what was going to be done, some resources. possible resources there were. then it just -- then it was just dropped. this was some time ago. i think it would be good to have other commissioners go on the tour and, you know, kind of get brought up to date on what's happened with that projec
" gets under way right now. >>> welcome to "closing bell." bill griffeth rejoins us in a moment. no follow-through rally. stocks closing in the red on fiscal cliff fears. dow jones lower by 43 points, 12,966. nasdaq finishes higher by nearly 10, 2,976. and the s&p down almost 3%, 1406. >> the deadline for the fiscal cliff is nearly one month away. if we go over that cliff, russ says some investors are not prepared for that decline. >> he joins us now a long with michael, cnbc contributor for destination wealth management and mary thompson joins us as well. russ, you're saying it's not priced in at this point. what should we be worried about? >> it's not priced in. it's very hard to find much evidence, either from investors or the sell side that people really expect to go over the fiscal cliff. i think what that means is if we get into the end of the year and looks like negotiations are not going forward, we may not solve this before 2013, we're likely to see rise in volatility, likely to see selling. >> how bad could it be? >> if you look at what might happened, in other words,
of the u.s. means less usage of natural gas, particularly in the northern midwest and we were going to get snow tomorrow under an inch. david: and we are seeing weakness the department store stocks. macy's and nordstrom's underperforming in that particular sector. liz: how about some jewelry for the holidays. a rough year, but today it is making a huge push to get consumers to buy diamonds and fine jewelry. president and ceo harvey cantor here live to tell us what those deals are including a huge giveaway they're doing and how we are doing and what kind of a halo effect they're having on the giveaway. david: and economic advisors warning middle-class tax rates to rise and failing to catch could cause consumers to spend $200 million less than they normally would next year. coming up chairman of the president's council of economic advisors joining us to talk about the fiscal cliff and whether we will go over it. liz: do not miss it. but first what drove the market with today's data download. the nasdaq the only major index. still a pretty rough day on light volume. the dow and s&p ending low
and some other things. the 6.7 million that is allocated for this project, 22% is going to be used for pilot project for the free muni for youth. the other 76%'s going to be used for maintenance. i don't know why. supervisor scott wiener is youth. this is something that we should consider as an important issue for our community. looking at the demographics, in terms of people opposing this project, just white women, rich, and majority of people of low income folks here, they support this project. i don't believe that this is something that is unsustainable. i think that the equity is there. there is funding for it. it's a pilot project that we can go forward and have it move -- be implemented. my last thing is that we should change the way we think in this city. this city is for everybody. we have to recognize san francisco values. we have to support everyone, not just blacks, latinos, asians, lives here. the way the debate was going, it's so racist and prejudicial. we have to stop the discrimination thing in the ci city. >> supervisor wiener: is there any additional public comment
the fire. how many people have used a fire extinguisher before. >> may be 10 percent of you. by the end of the week you will be putting out a fire with a fire extinguisher. you don't want to learn out to house an extinguisher when they big fire is in front of you. when you turn off your natural gas and water. hazardous materials will be talked about next week. 35-40 percent of you. you will find out that all of you have hazardous material in your home. the third week is disaster medicine. you, going into a room spending 45 seconds on one person into 3 life saving techniques. by the fourth we we will teach you as search and rescuers how to keep yourself safe by identifying safe and none safe building to go into. sometimes objects are too heavy for you to liftoff of a body. we will teach you privying which will use anything you have, wood or cement blocks so you is see that people can lift heavy objects off of people. now, you have to have a plan. every program needs to have a plan. we can't say, here are your skills. class 6, after half an hour we will split you into teams of 10 people
care, just being there makes all the difference. >>> my name is chris stevens, i'm the new u.s. ambassador to libya. i had the honor to serve as the envoy to the libyan revolution and i was thrilled to watch the libyan people stand up and demand their rights. now i'm excited to return to libya to continue the great work we've started, building a solid partnership between the united states and libya to help you the libyan people achieve your goals. right now i'm in washington, preparing for my assignment. as i walk around the monuments and memorials commemorating the courageous men and women that made america what it is, i'm reminded we too went through challenging periods, when america was divided by a bitter civil war 150 years ago. president abraham lincoln had the vision to pull us together toward a shared goal of peace and prosperity. growing up in california i didn't know much about the arab world. then after graduating from the university of california at berkeley, i traveled to north africa as peace corps engineer. i worked as an english teacher in morocco two years and
and be ready to go against the grover norquist pledge. more bill press after the break. stay with us. you're about to watch an viewer created ad message for little caesars who proudly salutes united states veterans everywhere. >> clarksville is a small town on the tennesse/kentucky boader and it is a really great place to raise a family. my name is lloyd allard i was a chief officer in the special forces, i was in the army for 23 years. i have made 1400 parachute jumps. well, my experience in the military was varied. i spent a lot of time in iraq, a lot of time in kuwait. i did two tours in iraq and i decided it was time to do something different with my life. i saw little caesars as a way to give something back to my family. the little caesars veterans program provides financial support and equipment when you open your store. the little caesars veterans program give me a sense of ownership and pride in my business because i am the owner of this business. as a former military person i did not have the business experience and little caesars provided the training and support along the way t
morning, thank you for waking up with us, this monday morning, november 25th, i am pam -- november 25th, -- november november 26th. >> and here is tara. >>> thanks, steve, here is a look at 280 and actually we have no fog so that is good news. bay point, that area is also looking fog free at this hour and those headlights are westbound as folks make their way towards concord and the  dense fog advisory is making for a tough commute on the bay bridge. lorraine blanco is live at the toll plaza with what drivers are dealing with that, hello. >> reporter: hello, tara, you can see it is extremely foggy behind me and you can barely see the light poles behind me and beyond that, tolls are not visible. be prepared for a lost breaking and also on the side streets, you couldn't see signs this morning and driving through a good part of the east bay is a challenge this morning. we shot video near emoryville and mcarthur maze. and an advisory is in effect here as well as the golden gate bridge, -- golden gate bridge, richmond san rafael and dinesh why bridges and remember to give yourself -- and v
morning news. >>> good morning, thank you for joining us on this monday morning, november 25th, i am pam cook. >> good morning, i am dave clark, let's check weather and traffic, i think he is over there somewhere in the fog. >> you have that banker look going on. >> you have to see the shoes. >> we have a very thick fog pattern over there, and give us a fog advisory so be careful and i am broad brushing this if you break through that fog, low- to-mid 60s. here is tara. >>> all right, steve this is a look at 680 and you can see traffic is moving along fairly at this hour and up next we have a heavy fog advisory for the bay bridge and you can see folks headed into the city and definitely give yourself some extra time. lorraine blanco is out there. how are people looking are they taking it slowly? >> yes, they are not taking it that slowly and the fog has not let up since we have been out here. just behind me is the toll plaza and you can't see it at all. now traffic is moving, moving rather slowly here and visibility is very low. here is a look at some iphone video as we head down in el ce
in san jose. jeanine della vega joins us live to let us know about the situation, good afternoon. >> reporter: police have this whole area roped off and this whole happened by this jewelry store and right now officers are talking to employees to try to piece together what happened. we know two armed men are on the run. let's go to some video we have from news chopper 2. this all started at about 10:10 this morning. police tell us two men entered this jewelry store and they did have a gun with them and the store clerk inside had a gun and fired back at the suspects and it is unknown if he hit one of them. those robbers ended up running out of the store and it's unclear whether there was a getaway car and they did not tell us whether they got away with any items inside the store and this is what they had to say. >> we have officers looking for witnesses and others are searching for video and this could possibly help in this investigation and we have officers canvassing the area looking for possible suspects. >>> now we are told by police that apparently the clerk said that the two
in the u.s., and those plants produce 130 million tons of waste called coal ash. it contains concentrations of mercury, arsenic, lead, and other toxic materials. and as lesley stahl first reported in 2009, when coal ash is dumped into wet ponds--and there are more than 500 of those across the country-- the result can have an enormous health risk on the people living in nearby communities. >> we get about 48%, nearly half of the electricity in this country from coal. >> jim roewer is one of the top lobbyists for the power industry. >> coal is going to be around for a long time. >> and we really can't get rid of coal. >> we shouldn't get rid of coal. >> well, should or shouldn't, we can't, and coal makes waste. would you say that the industry has done a good job of disposing of the coal ash waste? >> we can do better. >> does that mean no? >> well, we had a kingston spill. >> that's kingston, tennessee, where, in december 2008, a giant retention pool of coal ash buckled under the weight of five decades of waste. >> all the power lines have been knocked out. >> a billion gallons of muck shot i
year. courtney reagan's been tracking the numbers and she will join us with the details. also veteran retail analyst dana telsey will join us with her take. and coming up at 6:40, com score gives us a forecast for cyber monday sales. we of course continue to watch the fiscal cliff count down. lawmakers have been trying to convince the naub they are willing to compromise. they return to capitol hill today. >> everything should be on the table. >> bring entitlement reform into the conversation. >> a group of corporate executives are calling on congress to rise above partisan politics to try to find some sort of a solution. we have a lot to talk about with gleg brown and we'll start that in just a moment, but first over to andrew. >>> finance ministers are trying to unfreeze the second bailout package for greece, but first they must agree on how to cut massive debt to a more sustainable level. we'll head to london for details on that. and playing down a deal talk, tom joyce saying his country's currently if talks with at least two firms on a possible sale of its largest business unit. bu
. >>> also, the prospect of a big promotion for the u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, etch though he's been the target of republican attacks for weeks. up high! ok. don't you have any usefull apps on that thing? who do you think i am, quicken loans? ♪ at quicken loans, our amazingly useful mortgage calculator app allows you to quickly lculate your mortgage payment based on today's incredibly low interest rates... right from your iphone or android smartphone. one more way quicken loans is engineered to amaze. ♪ campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. anne's tablet called my phone. anne's tablet was chatting with a tablet in sydney... a desktop in zurich... and a telepresence room in brazil. the secure cloud helped us get some numbers from my assistant's pc in new york. and before i reached the top, the board meeting became a congrats we sold the company party. wait til my wife's phone hears about this. [ cellphone vibrating ] [ fema
brain with the conversation about pain. pain serves a very important function for us to survive, it teaches us what to avoid and lets us know when to seek medical help. at the same time, though it can create tremendous suffering. st. augustine once said the greatest evil is physical pain, 100 million americans live with it every day would yo would wouo doubt agree, pain knows no boundaries, regardless of age and race, beyond the physical symptoms the experience of chronic pain often leads to feelings of isolation and hopelessness. >> laura klein had been living with pain since a knee injury in 2008 and joins me this evening to speak about her experiences and incredible group of scientists are also here to discuss how we perceive and process pain, david bar stiewk of children's hospital and david julius of the university of california, san francisco, allan basbaum, also of the university of california san francisco, robert dworkin of the university of rochester and once again my cohost dr. eric kandel a nobel laureate, and a howard hughes medical investigator. >> our subject is p
later. congressman peter defazio, he's coming on with us a little bit later in the hour and he's indicate thad this fiscal cliff is not what everyone makes it out to be. in fact, he's in favor of or at least considering letting us go off the slope, cliff, whatever you want to call it to get a better congress in january. is that even proper to be discussing it in that direction at this point? >> i know this is going to be a pastacy because that's been a big issue over there. the reality is i don't think the fiscal cliff is not a fiscal cliff. i think it's a slope. i don't think it's going to ruin the economy if it happens over time, but the reality -- the problem is we don't want to cut tax de ww wwe -- we don't want t taxes or increase spending in the middle of an economic downturn. you've got do it where you expect it. the whole fiscal cliff conversation is an acknowledgement that the stimulus actually worked. what we're saying is we don't want to cut the deficit too fast. now when it comes to the fiscal deficit -- >> i want to transition you to the other hot topic that we've
offering system because if we don't have them they have to defer off route to use the facilities that we take for granted. it's very important for our operators. and then the lrv program, we've got 25% of the fleet has been rehabilitated. the doors and steps, which were the highest failure component of the lrvs have been rehabbed and we have a program to rehab all of the rest and i'll speak more to the rehab Ò(  we're proposing, moving forward. i mentioned in the capital budget we're making some significant investments in those really mission critical assets. here's just an example of what we have in our current budget. very significant investment in state of good repair, the church and duboce rail project is just about completed and anyone who's ridden the n judah or j church has noticed a significantly better ride experience as a result, there were many aspects of the system there, the rails, were overdue in terms of need of replacplacement and we basically have brand new infrastructure there. we're doing the same thing -- at the same time we did carlin cole on the other side of the
's names and i think that element will help revitalize the location that can use some revitalization. the building is not being used. families will not be disappointed. i look forward to the opportunity to building new connections with a different neighborhood and enjoying the beautiful space in san francisco. i think it's a good chance for new families and new members to get involved, and to meet one another, interact, just playing soccer games, meeting at a restaurant. i believe the sensitivity of the owners and family and employees will help contain a lot of the threatening elements i'm hearing right now and i don't believe it will be a sincere issue for anybody. thank you. >> supervisor farrell: thank you very much. next speaker please. >> supervisors, thank you very much for your time. my name is greg blaine. i'm a commissioner on the assessment appeals board. i'm a trustee of the university of san francisco, and chairman of the presidio performing arts center, i'm a landlord in the marina and elsewhere. and i'm a resident at 393 marina boulevard. while i'm generally not opposed
is a different world, isn't it? >> we have so many micro districts and pockets of different the used within two or three blocks. answering the question for one house may not always be the same as answering that question for different house. >> give us an idea. if you get a view, it will be different -- >> shore. the value of a simple remodel verses a very fancy kitchen remodel in a house that might be worth more than a condominium. those things can matter. it can make a difference. >> we have a request from one of our viewers to make sure we talk about -- home-improvement results and building taxes. >> accessible. >> the other thing that might be brought out his people over- improved. there is a fine line. i recommend that my client or anyone talk to realtors before they start. it is a good idea to get an idea of that neighborhood, that house, and how it can be done. >> page 22 of the handout, spend an hour with the pro. talk about what the value means and how it will add value to your home, or if it will be over spending on something that maybe you can do without. >> exactly. >> it is very imp
, is that we weren't going to reinvent the planning code. we used the eastern neighborhood zoning where possible, and we tweaked it. so, you'll find that when the plan gets to be really introduced and the nitty-gritty, we're able to use the umu, the umo, all the type of types of zoning character -- zoning categories that were already introduced. we did not rethink, let's say, the fees or the bmr units or anything else like that. we actually looked at what was there and if it could be adapted to reflect this fine grain community, we adopted it or we tweaked it. and, so, i think that what you'll see is this is a plan that allows for the next 20, 30 years of the growth of south of market, that reflects our planning principles and grew out of all the nuance pieces of it. thanks. >> thanks, toby. once upon a time in planning, transportation came first. they would build a streetcar line out into the wilderness, and then the housing and the commercial would follow and it would build around that. today it seems like we engage in a community plan and we slap on transportation after the fact. tom
a mosaic of the multi-dimensional man he was. i use that word because i wrote it yesterday afternoon want thinking of the mosaic of words, and the word cloud that abbey and will and you collaborated on to express the many dimensions of milton markses and you can look at those expressions of milton and likely add your own. like i said you will be from a number of folks giving their thoughts and tributes to milton today and please stay for the reception afterwards. sign the guest books which are now outside. some of you may have come in before they were placed and together we will create our word cloud and mosaic of milton. to begin it's my honor to introduce the mayor of san francisco, the honorable edwin lee. >> thank you peter. good afternoon everyone. welcome to city hall. it's my honor and pleasure to welcome all of you here on this reflection and celebration event, and just wanted to make sure you knew that when we were talking about this with abbey shortly after milton's passing away we thought it was a great opportunity for those that knew milton, knew his personality and engag
't get the one with the seven buttons and we had seven phones and all of us on the phone all the time. no hold button. our house was always full of people. i see many of you here that became family. you were there all the time, working on elections, and after my dad ran you helped my brother run. the same people helping us, being part of the family, working together for the city. i remember some of the crazy things we did growing up in political life. going to i think it's call -- i don't know if it's called the muni lot or parking lot and where the buss are in the morning so we could put a handout on every seat and bus that was there. i remember standing out in front of markets and it was raining and horrible and saying "will you vote for my dad" and milton loved this. he loved this energy and out of most of us and showed in what he ended up doing. all three kids learned at an early age giving to other people was one of the main things we were put on this world to do. our mom and dad taught us that. milton was a true believer sometimes to his detriment and would take on
allowed the pack to build staffing and infrastructure that help us be functional. without having to take money from the district and money that we feel should be supporting classrooms too, which is the lee foundation and the dela back family fund and we could not do without them. and we still have a pack report to do and i feel like i need to stop talking. we are going to leave after the pack report and go celebrate. don't take it personally. >> so we are going to move on to item d, student delegate's report, ly and wong. >> we attended the commission meeting, we heard supplement the budget supplemental that would provide $5 million to the school district. and the student council support thises and is interested in working with the youth commission to continue recommendations for effective credit recovery options. fcc is getting involved with improving the school meals and i met with paula jones with the director of department of public health. the reps will be taste testing for the bid of evaluation for a potential new vender. they will be developing the revisions to the policy. they ha
the central bank says it has to do more to show it's serious about stimulating growth. and in the u.s., consumers filled up their shopping carts. early estimates show sales up 13% over the lost holiday weekend. >>> welcome to the start of a fresh trading week. kelly will be back tomorrow. catalonia voters have handed the majority to the separatists, but not necessarily the ones you thought. we'll assess the impact. and investors worry among protests over the egyptian president's attempt to increase his power base. and how much would it cost you to buy all items in the song 12 days of christmas? pnc wealth management will tell us why it's a lot more than you might think. plus shoppers hitting the net today, the year's biggest day for online purchases. we'll asset how much cash shoppers have left over after black friday's billion dollar be in an sa. bonanza. we have some confident data out of italy. november consumer confidence 84.8. that is a record low. we've had protests, as well. they're gathering in brussels to try to hammer out a deal on the greek deficit. prime minister says they
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